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theatlantic:

This Is Big: Scientists Just Found Earth’s First-Cousin

Right now, 500 light years away from Earth, there’s a planet that looks a lot like our own. It is bathed in dim orangeish light, which at high noon is only as bright as the golden hour before sunset back home. 
NASA scientists are calling the planet Kepler-186f, and it’s unlike anything they’ve found. The big news: Kepler-186f is the closest relative to the Earth that researchers have discovered. 
It’s the first Earth-sized planet in the habitable zone of another star—the sweet spot between too-hot Mercury-like planets and too-cold Neptunes— and it is likely to give scientists their first real opportunity to seek life elsewhere in the universe. “It’s no longer in the realm of science fiction,” said Elisa Quintana, a researcher at the SETI Institute. 
But if there is indeed life on Kepler-186f, it may not look like what we have here. Given the redder wavelengths of light on the planet, vegetation there would sprout in hues of yellow and orange instead of green. 
Read more. [Image: NASA Ames/SETI Institute/JPL-Caltech]

theatlantic:

This Is Big: Scientists Just Found Earth’s First-Cousin

Right now, 500 light years away from Earth, there’s a planet that looks a lot like our own. It is bathed in dim orangeish light, which at high noon is only as bright as the golden hour before sunset back home. 

NASA scientists are calling the planet Kepler-186f, and it’s unlike anything they’ve found. The big news: Kepler-186f is the closest relative to the Earth that researchers have discovered. 

It’s the first Earth-sized planet in the habitable zone of another star—the sweet spot between too-hot Mercury-like planets and too-cold Neptunes— and it is likely to give scientists their first real opportunity to seek life elsewhere in the universe. “It’s no longer in the realm of science fiction,” said Elisa Quintana, a researcher at the SETI Institute. 

But if there is indeed life on Kepler-186f, it may not look like what we have here. Given the redder wavelengths of light on the planet, vegetation there would sprout in hues of yellow and orange instead of green.

Read more. [Image: NASA Ames/SETI Institute/JPL-Caltech]

Quote
"Life is truly beautiful if you just take a moment to look, listen, and feel."

— Jenny Prinn

Video

buttonpoetry:

In two weeks, Button will be traveling to Boulder, CO to film this year’s College Unions Poetry Slam Invitational. REBLOG Lily along with the title of one of your favorite poems from last year’s tournament (full playlist here) and we’ll feature some of them again here and on Facebook as we amp up for CUPSI 2014!

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nprontheroad:

Nuevo Laredo, Mexico  - Ruben Flores, 64, sits inside his one-room office. He types letters for people who can’t write. He opened his stall in 1964, just across from the city’s municipal building. For nearly 50 years he’s helped people with everything from taxes to government forms, but his favorite letters to write are love letters. To him the border has changed a lot over time and today he says it makes it harder for people to get visas and for tourists to enter his city.
Throughout the years he’s seen a lot of life pass by and has many memories. One of his fondest — the night he and his friends went to see the Beatles in ‘A Hard Days Night.’ “I remember the day like it was yesterday,” said Flores, with a wide grin.
And yes, he really said that, believe me I didn’t prompt the pun. Half his answers were in Beatles lyrics.
(@kainazamaria/NPR)

nprontheroad:

Nuevo Laredo, Mexico  - Ruben Flores, 64, sits inside his one-room office. He types letters for people who can’t write. He opened his stall in 1964, just across from the city’s municipal building. For nearly 50 years he’s helped people with everything from taxes to government forms, but his favorite letters to write are love letters. To him the border has changed a lot over time and today he says it makes it harder for people to get visas and for tourists to enter his city.

Throughout the years he’s seen a lot of life pass by and has many memories. One of his fondest — the night he and his friends went to see the Beatles in ‘A Hard Days Night.’ “I remember the day like it was yesterday,” said Flores, with a wide grin.

And yes, he really said that, believe me I didn’t prompt the pun. Half his answers were in Beatles lyrics.

(@kainazamaria/NPR)

(via npr)

Photo
Light can do beautiful things.

Light can do beautiful things.

(Source: , via roseghosts)

Quote
"Adventure is worthwhile."

— Aesop

Quote
"Be kind whenever possible. It is always possible."

— Dalai Lama

Photo
utnereader:

The Wello WaterWheel
A simple yet innovative product makes getting clean water faster and easier.

utnereader:

The Wello WaterWheel

A simple yet innovative product makes getting clean water faster and easier.

Quote
"Historically, the most terrible things – war, genocide, and slavery – have resulted not from disobedience, but from obedience."

— Howard Zinn

Quote
"Give back your heart to itself, to the stranger who has loved you all your life, whom you ignored for another, who knows you by heart."

— Derek Walcott

Photo
Via A Mighty Girl. What an awesome photo of a kid experiencing art and being allowed to express herself!

Via A Mighty Girl. What an awesome photo of a kid experiencing art and being allowed to express herself!

Photo
amightygirl:

Today in Mighty Girl history, six-year-old Ruby Bridges walked into William Frantz Elementary School in New Orleans surrounded by a team of U.S. Marshals; thus, becoming the first African-American child to desegregate an all-white elementar
y school in the South. When Ruby arrived at school that first day in 1960, an event commemorated by Norman Rockwell in his famous painting “The Problem We All Live With,” she was met by a vicious mob shouting and throwing objects at her. One of the federal marshals, Charles Burks, who served on her escort team, recalls Ruby’s courage in the face of such hatred: “For a little girl six years old going into a strange school with four strange deputy marshals, a place she had never been before, she showed a lot of courage. She never cried. She didn’t whimper. She just marched along like a little soldier. We were all very proud of her.”Once Ruby entered the school, she discovered that it was devoid of children because they had all been removed by their parents due to Ruby’s presence. The only teacher willing to have Ruby as a student was Barbara Henry, who had recently moved from Boston. Ruby was taught by herself for her first year at the school due to the white parents’ boycott. Despite daily harassment, which required the federal marshals to continue escorting her to school for months; threats towards her family; and her father’s job loss due to his family’s role in school integration, Ruby persisted in attending school. The following year, when she returned for second grade, the mobs were gone and more African-American students joined her at the school. The pioneering effort to integrate schools in the South was a success due to Ruby’s amazing courage, perseverance, and resiliency.If you’d like to share Ruby’s inspiring story with the children in your life, there are three excellent resources to help you do so, including the wonderful picture book “The Story Of Ruby Bridges” (http://www.amightygirl.com/the-story-of-ruby-bridges) for readers 4 to 8 and the highly recommended memoir that Ruby Bridges wrote for young readers from 6 to 12 entitled “Through My Eyes” (http://www.amightygirl.com/through-my-eyes). Disney also made a terrific film about her story called “Ruby Bridges” for viewers 7 and up (http://www.amightygirl.com/ruby-bridges).To give young readers more insight into the school integration struggle, Nobel Prize-winning author, Toni Morrison, has written an outstanding book, that’s filled with photos capturing the major desegregation events of the period, entitled “Remember: The Journey to School Integration” (http://www.amightygirl.com/remember-the-journey-to-school-integration) — recommended for ages 9 and up.

I love A Mighty Girl. They often remind me of things that were glossed over, or simply not covered in history class. This little girl’s story is simultaneously so sad (going to school all alone for a year! imagine the loneliness!) and such a victory.

amightygirl:

Today in Mighty Girl history, six-year-old Ruby Bridges walked into William Frantz Elementary School in New Orleans surrounded by a team of U.S. Marshals; thus, becoming the first African-American child to desegregate an all-white elementar

y school in the South. When Ruby arrived at school that first day in 1960, an event commemorated by Norman Rockwell in his famous painting “The Problem We All Live With,” she was met by a vicious mob shouting and throwing objects at her. 

One of the federal marshals, Charles Burks, who served on her escort team, recalls Ruby’s courage in the face of such hatred: “For a little girl six years old going into a strange school with four strange deputy marshals, a place she had never been before, she showed a lot of courage. She never cried. She didn’t whimper. She just marched along like a little soldier. We were all very proud of her.”

Once Ruby entered the school, she discovered that it was devoid of children because they had all been removed by their parents due to Ruby’s presence. The only teacher willing to have Ruby as a student was Barbara Henry, who had recently moved from Boston. Ruby was taught by herself for her first year at the school due to the white parents’ boycott. 

Despite daily harassment, which required the federal marshals to continue escorting her to school for months; threats towards her family; and her father’s job loss due to his family’s role in school integration, Ruby persisted in attending school. The following year, when she returned for second grade, the mobs were gone and more African-American students joined her at the school. The pioneering effort to integrate schools in the South was a success due to Ruby’s amazing courage, perseverance, and resiliency.

If you’d like to share Ruby’s inspiring story with the children in your life, there are three excellent resources to help you do so, including the wonderful picture book “The Story Of Ruby Bridges” (http://www.amightygirl.com/the-story-of-ruby-bridges) for readers 4 to 8 and the highly recommended memoir that Ruby Bridges wrote for young readers from 6 to 12 entitled “Through My Eyes” (http://www.amightygirl.com/through-my-eyes). Disney also made a terrific film about her story called “Ruby Bridges” for viewers 7 and up (http://www.amightygirl.com/ruby-bridges).

To give young readers more insight into the school integration struggle, Nobel Prize-winning author, Toni Morrison, has written an outstanding book, that’s filled with photos capturing the major desegregation events of the period, entitled “Remember: The Journey to School Integration” (http://www.amightygirl.com/remember-the-journey-to-school-integration) — recommended for ages 9 and up.

I love A Mighty Girl. They often remind me of things that were glossed over, or simply not covered in history class. This little girl’s story is simultaneously so sad (going to school all alone for a year! imagine the loneliness!) and such a victory.

Photo
theatlantic:

Wall Street Wakes Up to 3D Printing, Predicts Massive Growth

Wall Street is starting to wake up to the potential of 3D printing. This morning Citi analyst Kenneth Wong released a bullish note projecting that the market for 3D printing and related services will triple by 2018, citing the leading companies in this area, Stratasys and 3D Systems. (Granted, such rapid growth is possible partly because the industry is still tiny, just $1.7 billion in 2011, with the market for 3D printed parts accounting for about half of that.)
Wong attributes future growth to such mouthfuls as “broader adoption across more upstream production applications and the consumer end market,” and “increased utilization of existing systems as customers start to extend use case beyond small batch digital manufacturing,” but here’s what that means in plain English.
3D printing will explode in 2014, thanks to the expiration of key patents. Soon, you won’t have to master the (challenging, time-consuming) task of learning how to model things in 3D, because you’ll just be copying them from the real world usingcheap, effective 3D scanners. This technology will also enable 3D faxing (should anybody want it) and the democratization of fine art.
Read more. [Image: Alexis Madrigal]


It’s such an interesting time we’re in.

theatlantic:

Wall Street Wakes Up to 3D Printing, Predicts Massive Growth

Wall Street is starting to wake up to the potential of 3D printing. This morning Citi analyst Kenneth Wong released a bullish note projecting that the market for 3D printing and related services will triple by 2018, citing the leading companies in this area, Stratasys and 3D Systems. (Granted, such rapid growth is possible partly because the industry is still tiny, just $1.7 billion in 2011, with the market for 3D printed parts accounting for about half of that.)

Wong attributes future growth to such mouthfuls as “broader adoption across more upstream production applications and the consumer end market,” and “increased utilization of existing systems as customers start to extend use case beyond small batch digital manufacturing,” but here’s what that means in plain English.

3D printing will explode in 2014, thanks to the expiration of key patents. Soon, you won’t have to master the (challenging, time-consuming) task of learning how to model things in 3D, because you’ll just be copying them from the real world usingcheap, effective 3D scanners. This technology will also enable 3D faxing (should anybody want it) and the democratization of fine art.

Read more. [Image: Alexis Madrigal]

It’s such an interesting time we’re in.

Quote
"Everyone gets the experience; some get the lesson."

— T.S. Eliot

Tags: T.S. Eliot
Quote
"

1. Do not kill yourself. Killing yourself is very messy and your mother will cry over you. It is not beautiful or brave, and even if it was, you will not be around to see that.

2. Washing your hair is going to be a chore. But you should do it anyway. Because you will feel better about yourself.

3. Get up late. Have a lay in. Sleep past your alarm. You have a very long life ahead of you and for now you should appreciate the cold side of your pillow.

4. He is going to break your heart but he’s just another male human who finds it hard to deal with Mondays, too. So in a month you’ll wake up and you won’t even remember that little scar on his knuckle you kissed.

5. Don’t spend hours looking up what your name means on google. Your name is your name and you should go out there and do heroic and good deeds and give your name your own meaning.

6. Don’t fight your demons. Your demons are here to teach you lessons. Sit down with your demons and have a drink and a chat and learn their names and talk about the burns on their fingers and scratches on their ankles. Some of them are very nice.

7. Music is good for your soul. Rap music will energise you and boost your ego and pop music will cheer you up. Indie music will make you think and emotional songs will make you cry and think about that boy again. It’s healthy.

8. Victim complexes are not attractive. Boys and girls will not date you because you are sad. They are not going to date you and kiss your aching bones and cure you of your dragging depression. Wake up. Take a bath. Do your hair. Be attractive.

9. Sadness is not poetic. Depression is not beautiful. Laying in bed all day and eating too much is lazy and disgusting and it is not tragic or pretty. Get up. Go outside. Let the sun warm your bones. Live.

10. If it makes you happy, buy twenty of it. Dedicate your life to it. Print it on tv shirts and collect things and draw art of it. Do not care what people think. They are the unhappy people you need to avoid. The abuse they will hurl at you is painless compared to how sad they are. Pity them. Remain happy.

11. You are allowed to he angry. But the world is not working against you. The flowers do not bloom for you and when your mother shouts ask her if she is okay instead of thinking she hates you. She never will. The world walks beside you and is silent. It does not trip you up or carry you.

12. Day and night cycles are natural. Humans only sleep at night because we used to avoid predators in the dark because of our poor eyesight. Stay awake until 5am watching bad reality shows. Wake up at 7pm and have breakfast.

13. Eat when you are hungry. Being bored does not constitute a chocolate bar. Sleep with you are tired. Do not mindlessly obey the sleep at night rule. If you are not tired, do not sleep.

"

— Lapfoxs  (via baveuile)

With regard to demons: “Some of them are very nice”. Yeah. Isn’t that typically the problem?

(Source: bakrua, via baveuile)